Ski
Patrol

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Ski Patrol

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Beacon Requirements

Avalanches in open ski areas are rare, but do occur on occasion. Alyeska Resort is now requiring beacons in the following hike-to outer areas: High Silver, Low Sunspots Traverse, Headwall, Moneys, Max’s and Glacier Bowl. Not only will this new policy raise avalanche awareness, it also raises the odds of a live recovery should a person get caught or buried while skiing or riding in this steep, avalanche prone terrain.

Emergency Line: 907-754-2500

Beacon Requirements

Avalanches in open ski areas are rare, but do occur on occasion. Alyeska Resort is now requiring beacons in the following hike-to outer areas: High Silver, Low Sunspots Traverse, Headwall, Moneys, Max’s and Glacier Bowl. Not only will this new policy raise avalanche awareness, it also raises the odds of a live recovery should a person get caught or buried while skiing or riding in this steep, avalanche prone terrain.

Emergency Line: 907-754-2500

Who Are We?

Alyeska Pro Patrol

Full and Part time paid positions covering the mountain seven days a week from the beginning until the end of the ski season during operating hours.

Volunteer Patrol

National Ski Patrol Volunteers that supplement our staff during busy times like weekends and holidays. When Alyeska’s visitor numbers swell, the Volunteer Patrol plays a crucial role in our ability to provide adequate Ski Patrol coverage for the entire mountain.

What Do We Do?

We provide basic medical treatment for injured skiers and riders, a free service provided by Alyeska Resort. Alyeska Ski Patrol trains each fall and continually during the season to keep up with any changing protocols within the Outdoor Emergency Care curriculum and to keep our skills sharp. Additional to the OEC certification that we all carry, many of our patrollers hold other certifications and licenses such as WFR, EMT I, II, III, Paramedic, and Physician’s Assistant.

We train in many types of extrication methods and use a variety of tools and equipment to transport a person in need to the base area from anywhere within our boundaries. At the base area we may use a snow machine for transportation and further up the mountain we may place guests in a sled known as a Ski Patrol Toboggan for transportation to the base area.  As the difficulty of the terrain compounds, we begin using ropes and high angle rescue techniques such as complex multi-anchor mechanical advantage systems to aid our rescue efforts.

We work on a mountain that contains an enormous amount of avalanche terrain, therefore we train often for avalanche search and rescue. All patrollers carry a beacon, shovel, and probe at all times and we are also equipped with the RECCO detection system.

Alyeska Resort has six chairlifts. If any of those experience any kind of mechanical breakdown, we are always ready to step in.

Where Are We?

We are out ski patrolling the mountain of course!

We also have patrol stations around the mountain stocked with medical and rescue equipment appropriate for its location.

Where Are We?

We are out ski patrolling the mountain of course!

We also have patrol stations around the mountain stocked with medical and rescue equipment appropriate for its location.

First Aid Room
First Aid Room
First Aid Room
This is our base area headquarters and the location we transport all patients to from the hill.
Aid Room Tel:
907-754-2270
The Roundhouse Ski Patrol Dispatch
The Roundhouse Ski Patrol Dispatch
The Roundhouse Ski Patrol Dispatch
Located on the bottom floor of the Historical Roundhouse Building, this is where all of our communications centralize.
Accident Reporting Hotline:
907-754-2500
Top of Two Patrol Station
Top of Two Patrol Station
Top of Two Patrol Station
The building we call home for our Top Patrol Station is the top lift station of the original Chair Two, the base of which was destroyed by an avalanche in 1974. It is from this point that we prepare to respond to anything in our open area.
Don Spencer’s Shelter
Don Spencer’s Shelter
Don Spencer’s Shelter
This is a new Patrol station for winter 2018 and named after the late Volunteer Patrol Representative Don Spencer, who passed away in the spring of 2016. This Patrol station is located at the top of the Ted’s Express lift.
First Aid Room
First Aid Room
First Aid Room
This is our base area headquarters and the location we transport all patients to from the hill.
Aid Room Tel:
907-754-2270
The Roundhouse Ski Patrol Dispatch
The Roundhouse Ski Patrol Dispatch
The Roundhouse Ski Patrol Dispatch
Located on the bottom floor of the Historical Roundhouse Building, this is where all of our communications centralize.
Accident Reporting Hotline:
907-754-2500
Top of Two Patrol Station
Top of Two Patrol Station
Top of Two Patrol Station
The building we call home for our Top Patrol Station is the top lift station of the original Chair Two, the base of which was destroyed by an avalanche in 1974. It is from this point that we prepare to respond to anything in our open area.
Don Spencer’s Shelter
Don Spencer’s Shelter
Don Spencer’s Shelter
This is a new Patrol station for winter 2018 and named after the late Volunteer Patrol Representative Don Spencer, who passed away in the spring of 2016. This Patrol station is located at the top of the Ted’s Express lift.

Mountain Safety

Alyeska is a member of the National Ski Area Association, and as such we adopt the same general mountain safety codes and regulations found across the country that are part of the NSAA system.

First and foremost, skiing and riding safely is everyone’s responsibility. 

While on the slopes, you will see people using alpine skis, telemark skis, snowboards, and other specialized equipment such as the adaptive skis used by skiers with disabilities. You will see skiers of all levels – from beginners enjoying their first day on the slopes to expert skiers with years of experience. It is always your responsibility, regardless of the equipment used or the level of skier that you are, to be courteous to others and to be aware that skiing safely makes the ski slopes safer for all of us.

Alyeska is a large mountain with difficult and dangerous terrain and skiing and riding are dangerous sports.  We do our best to inform guests of the possible hazards associated with snow sports. We do our best to mark hazards and dangerous terrain appropriately. We also actively open and close certain areas of the mountain often due to Snow Safety considerations, ski conditions, or darkness.

Our beginner ski zones and high skier traffic areas are important to us and we refer to these areas as “Slow” zones. We label them as such on our trail maps and with signs and banners as you ski through each of these areas. We encourage guests to ‘Go with the Flow’ in these areas, ski only as fast as the skier next to you. Our least favorite part of the job is to be the police on the mountain. We do our best to keep an eye on people skiing around to ensure everyone is skiing safely and within their limits.

Alyeska has set Enforcement Guidelines based on the Skier Responsibility Code and Mountain Safety Concerns for behavior on the mountain. When an individual crosses these lines, we have to step in and be the police, and we have no tolerance for unsafe behavior at Alyeska. We have a relationship with the Department of Natural Resources and due to this relationship we issue DNR citations to individuals in violations of certain rules. In addition to loss of lift privileges and fines we also require all ‘violators’ to take the Mountain Education Test, a tool used to help educate.

Take the Mountain Education Test

Know the Code

Skier Responsibility Code

  1. Always stay in control and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  3. You must not stop where you obstruct a trail or are not visible from above.
  4. Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  5. Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  7. Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.
  8. Inverted aerials are not recommended.
  9. Use of alcohol or drugs that impair the safety of yourself or others is not allowed.
  10. Be safety conscious.
  11. If you are involved in a collision with another skier/boarder you must stay at the scene until ski patrol arrives. 

Know The Code. It’s Your Responsibility.

The National Ski Area Association and Burton Snowboards have developed the “Smart Style” Freestyle Terrain Safety initiative, a cooperative effort to continue the proper use and progression of freestyle terrain at mountain resorts.

  1. MAKE A PLAN
    Every time you use freestyle terrain, make a plan for each feature you want to use. Your speed, approach and take off will directly affect your maneuver and landing.
  2. LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
    Scope around the jumps first, not over them. Know your landings are clear and clear yourself out of the landing area.
  3. EASY STYLE IT
    Start small and work your way up. (Inverted aerials not recommended except in events & terrain park).
  4. RESPECT GETS RESPECT
    From the lift line through the park.
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Learn More

Know the signs of the international trail marking system. They explain the degree and difficulty for each trail.

trailsignage

The system of difficulty markers is relative and only valid at this area. This system is not necessarily the same as a similarly rated trail at another ski area. Skiers/boarders should begin with the easiest trails regardless of ability level, until familiar with the trails at the area. During periods of low visibility or other inclement weather and snow conditions, the degree of difficulty of the ski/snowboard run my change. Know your ability level and stay within it.

Under Alaska law, the risk of an injury to a person or property resulting from any of the inherent dangers and risks of skiing rests with the skier. Inherent dangers and risks of skiing include changing weather conditions; existing and changing snow conditions; bare spots; rocks, stumps and trees; collisions with natural objects, man-made objects, or other skiers; variations in terrain; and the failure of skiers to ski within their own abilities. If you are involved in a collision with another skier/boarder you must stay at the scene until ski patrol arrives.

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Be advised that all poles, flags, fencing, signage and padding on equipment or objects or other forms of marking devices are used by the area to inform you of the presence or location of a potential obstacle or hazard. These markers are no guarantee of your safety and will not protect you from injury. A rope line made up of bamboo and rope, with no closed signs, indicates a hazard behind the line and can be considered a warning rope.

Please observe posted SLOW ZONE areas by maintaining a speed no faster than the general flow of traffic. Fast and aggressive skiing/boarding will result in the loss of skiing privileges.

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